Karim Lakra - Portfolio

3D printed peristaltic pump (07.03.2018)

Edit 02 Sep 2019 :
code for Arduino driver: https://github.com/KarimLakra/OSP2_Op...

I needed for many things a water pump(liquid pump), I found the peristaltic pump the best for a precision dosing, can be used also for continuous pumping, the liquid is separated by the tubing from other parts, it can be used for food and many applications safely, offers easy maintenance...

After I watched many designs, as always, I like to design my own to see how far I can make it, so feel free to suggest any useful tips!

The capacity of this pump as you can see in the video is about 160ml per minute, you can push this value a little bit it upper, but I didn't want to destroy the tubing.

The pump is easy to assemble, but I attached pictures step by step.

Notes:

I changed the M3 nut holes after printing this parts, so if anyone notice something that needs to be changed, please let me know.

I made holes for the M3 nut that are not used all of them, but they can be useful if you need to lock very well the parts together. I made also deep holes for the M3 screws, so if you want to use a longer screws, they have place already.

Testing the pump
You can also watch this video on youtube
3D printed peristaltic pump - parts & print Settings
  • 4 * M3 nuts
  • 3 * M1,85x10 screw
  • 3 * M3x3 screw
  • 4 * M3x8 screw
  • 4 * M3x11 screw
  • 3 * Bearings 5x13x4mm 695ZZ(I attached also a printable bearing if you want to try it)
  • Tubing PharMed BPT (information in the picture)
Print Settings
Printer:
ANYCUBIC I3 MEGA
Rafts:
Doesn't Matter
Supports:
Yes
Resolution:
0,4
Infill:
100%
Exploded view of the pump
From right to left:
  • Nema 17 support(this is not included in this design just for reference).
  • This is an adapter between the motor and the wall that holds the tubing, with 4 holes for the M3 nuts
  • The wall that holds the tubing.
  • The cover that stops the tubing from getting out when the pump turns.
Step1
Before this step, make sure the M3 nuts fits in the motor side, after that attach the M3*8 screws to the motor.
Step2
Now check that the M3*11 screws goes easily, you can make the holes bigger or just place the screws in their places and heat them from the top by a soldering iron and press gently.
Step3

There is attached file for the rollers if you decide to print them, make sure you make their edges smooth, so you will not cut the tubing.

Also the triangles that holds the bearings, are marked by a line as in the pictures, that sides must be in the same vertical line, that sides are locking the triangle to prevent it from turning.

I used a short screws for the cover, but the holes are deep for a longer screws.

Step4
Now check that the holes where the tubing goes are enough clean and smooth before you insert the tubing.
Step5

Place the triangles so the the lower triangle is the same level with the lower wall as shown in the picture.

I prefer to leave the screws that keep the triangles together upper side, for an easy maintenance in the future if needed.

Step6
Start from right to left, turning the triangle and press the tubing down until you get the tubing as shown in the picture.
Step7
Just lock the last piece and make sure that the tubing is correctly in place, and you are ready to start your tests!
Nema 17
There is many versions of Nema 17 , so here is the one used here.
Tubing
There is different tubing prices and qualities, this one costed me 18,27 euros for 0,5m.
Schematic with modules

This is a simple circuit to control the stepper, two configurable modules just some resistors and you are ready to go.
An input "Enable" is also useful in case if you need to control the start stop digitally, but here, it is a physical switch, which is not doing much, it is better in this case to use the power switch if you want to use this schematic instead of Enable.

The parts needed here are:

  • A stepper motor Nema 17 of course as showen.
  • A power supply 12V to 24V can be used
  • 1 * buck step-down can be added to get the 5V from 12V/24V.
  • 1 * resistor 330R
  • 1 * resistor 10K
  • 1 * NPN transistor BC547
  • A buck step-down
  • 1 axis stepper controller
  • 2 * momentary toggle switch(the second switch can be used to pause the pump when the switch Enable is closed.)
  • 1 * NE555 module

Other Schematic

This is the same circuit but here you have more things to do your self.

The parts needed here are:

  • A stepper motor Nema 17 of course as showen.
  • A power supply 12V to 24V can be used, and from 12V/24V a buck step-down can be added to get the 5V.
  • 1 * resistor 330R
  • 2 * resistor 1K
  • 1 * resistor 10K
  • 1 * capacitor 40nF
  • 1 * NPN transistor BC547
  • A buck step-down
  • 1 axis stepper controller
  • 2 * momentary toggle switch(the second switch can be used to pause the pump when the switch Enable is closed.)
  • 1 * NE555 timer

The stepper controller
You can see the switchs configuration that worked better for me, but they are for reference only, other configuration is needed depending on how the motor is needed to work.

555 Timer module
Cheap and easy to use, this module offers 5 options to get different frequencies and duty cycles. The picture is self explanatory.

The modules
At last, this is a picture with the prices as a reference.

Bellow is a zip file containing the STL files for 3D printing (right click the icon, and choose "Save Link As.." from the drop down menu).
For you computer safety, I recommend that you download the STL files from here: Thingverse